Wood Burning Stove – The Way Heating Should be Generated When Camping, NATURALLY!

For some individuals, being away in the wilderness and very far from civilization is the best type of relaxation and a way to rejuvenate from their normal and busy lives. For this reason, several nature enthusiasts choose to be free from trendy technology and fuel sources when out camping or hiking in the wilderness. This is where wood burning stoves come into the picture to provide that needed freedom from fuel consumption and the same time still allow the ability to have a nice hot meal all along your camping period. Wood burning stoves (log burners or wood burner) not only helps the environment, but also reduces to a large extent the load a camper would have to pack for an enjoyable camping experience.

 

Advantages of Wood Burning Stove

Again, one huge benefit of wood burning stoves is the reduction of fuel consumption. Many folks still have no clue about the environmental impact caused by getting and burning fossil fuels, even for apparently tiny camp and cooking fires. The way the fuel gets on our store shelves for purchase starts with exploration and extraction that in itself is damaging ton of natural resources. From there, refineries and distribution plays its own role in damaging our environment further. Simply by choosing another fuel alternative (in this case wood) you’re serving the environment and nourish the wild land that is still left for us. That alone is a wonderful advantage of wood burning stoves to be proud about.

 

Another pro for using a wood burning stove is the satisfaction you get to feel from collecting your own fire fuel. If you have gone camping with young kids, this will be particularly one of the fun ways for them to participate in the whole camping activity. Creating a game out of it can create tremendous memories for your family, particularly if great discoveries are made when out searching for logs. It also does not matter if you are camping all

Wood Stove

Wood Stove

by yourself, this might as well be the component that gets you more closely connected with nature as you hike and hunt for fuel for your camp fireplace.

 

Also do not forget, wood burning stoves are extraordinarily light-weight in comparison to stoves that utilize fossil fuel that always come in some serious large tanks. To make things more interesting, there are actually several models in stores these days that break down into many items allowing transportation of the stove itself to be way easier. Some models even have specialised built-in pot holders and hand protectors that double as a carrying sack.

 

An additional and critical benefit of using wood burning stoves is their ability to double as your camp fireplace. Camp fires are a vital component in the whole camping experience once you are out there in the wilderness. Fireplace will scare away bugs from getting close to your camp area, can be used to dry your garments as you know you will get wet from your wilderness adventures, and of course in the end a campfire will always give you heat when the sun goes down.

 

For some individuals, being away in the wilderness and very far from civilization is the best type of relaxation and a way to rejuvenate from their normal and busy daily lives. For this reason, several nature enthusiasts choose to be free from trendy technology and fuel sources when out camping or hiking in the wilderness. This is where wood burning stoves come into the picture to provide that needed freedom from fuel consumption and the same time still allow the ability to have a nice hot meal all along your camping period. Wood burning stoves not only helps the environment, but also reduces to a large extent the load a camper would have to pack for a maximum enjoyable camping experience.

 

Now, How do We Light a Fire on a Wood Stove?

 

Preparation

 

Wood burning stoves have a door at the front wherever the wood is inserted and then fired up. The smoke that’s made by the wood or pallets passes up the flue and all the way up the chimney. It sounds very simple, however, it’s vital to use the proper kind of wood, not performance reasons but due to the fact a wrong type can cause damaging.

 

For this reason it’s critical to opt for wood that has been dried out (or seasoned) for a minimum of a year. Here is a basic guide even though various types of wood take different period of time to dry out. Wood logs that area damp will cause a build of resin in the chimney and as soon as this material reaches a particular temperature it will catch light, situation that can easily turn out to be a fireplace hazard.

 

Wood seasoning requires cutting it to the desired size and stacking it. Make sure you wood is covered but leave the edges of the pile open in order for air to get through. It will also be very useful to keep the wood indoors for a while prior using it. Simple remaining step is to analyze if your wood is well seasoned by looking at the signs of split, which is usually an indication that the wood has dried out enough.

 

Kindling

 

Kindling is little pieces of dried wood use to start a fire. It can be made ready by chopping up some seasoned firewood into little, long parts to resemble small sticks. The best and highly recommend woods to use for kindling are beech or ash. In addition to making sure you woods are seasoned, you should double check if any of your woods have been painted, varnished or treated with any form of wood preservative.

 

Types of Wood

 

Some forms of wood burn better than others, therefore it’s best to bear in mind of the qualities that different kinds of woods have. The quality of a specific style of wood can rely upon numerous factors like how simply can it get started, how quick it burns, what quantity of heat it generates and the time it takes to be seasoned.

Here are the ten highly recommended wood categories to consider using in your camp stove. The list has no order of preference:

 

  1. Apple: As you would possibly expect, apple wood is very popular for the good scent it generates once burnt. In addition, it is a good wood to burn from a real life perspective. It burns slowly and doesn’t spit or spark.

    Oak and Beech Wood

    Oak and Beech Wood

 

  1. Ash: Popularly believed to be amongst the best burning woods, ash offers enough heat output and a consistent burn. It additionally has the advantage of burning quite well once freshly cut, however like all other wood types, it’s still better to use it after it’s seasoned.

 

  1. Beech: Hot on the heels of ash, another wood-burning stove popular. It doesn’t quite live up to the lofty levels of ash – and seasoning is a lot more vital with beech – however it still remains as a good choice overall.

 

  1. Cedar: Despite generating little flames, cedar may be a misleadingly efficient and great wood to use on your stove. It offers off a good deal of warmth once burnt, that last longer.

 

  1. Hawthorn: Both shrub and blackthorn generated makes good firewood. They burn slowly and provides off enough and needed heat.

 

  1. Holly: Not a wood that you may think of in the first place as your choice of fire. However, holly is truly a choice to be really considered. It’s best once allowed to season for a minimum of a year. From this seasoning, it’ll burn quick, albeit giving off less heat than some choices on this list.

 

  1. Maple: This wood is the best performing in all aspects and definitely the best choice for your wood burning stove.

 

  1. Pear: it resembles apple in burning aspect and also in terms of fruit. This translates to a great scent, decent heat and really very minimal spitting.

 

  1. Oak: the correct amount of oak will make a wonderful fuel source for your burning stove and camping in general, but unfortunately this type of wood can be a bit fussy. If you’ll be able to get an old enough oak that has been seasoned for an extended duration of time, it’ll burn slowly and supply enough heat.

 

  1. Pine: Burns fine and is noted for its nice flame. Normally, its main downside is the tendency to spit a lot once burning, however that’s clearly less of a concern with a wood-burning stove than an open fire.

 

Generally speaking, soft woods burn faster than hard woods. All woods have totally opposite characteristics. However some good recommended selections for wood burning stoves are ash, beech and hazel. On the other end, those of low quality for burning include larch, pine and poplar.

 

Building the Fire

 

Even though there are numerous ways for lighting a fire in a log burner, the subsequent technique could be the best one. Begin with the removal of any ash in the stove to make sure there is no blockage of air flow into the fire. Also consider opening the vents at the bottom of the wood stove since these vents will enable air to flow into and facilitate the fire to start quicker.

Lighting a Wood Stove

Lighting a Wood Stove

After that, insert some scrunched up paper at very bottom of the fire; previous newspaper is handy for this. it’s best to use lots as this will make the flames spread evenly. In addition, do not forget to place a layer of kindling sticks above the paper in order for the sticks to cross over one another in several directions.

 

Lighting the Fire

 

Once you have completed spreading the kindling sticks you’ll lightup the paper. it’s best to get this done in many places then shut the stove door. Once enough kindle has become lit, you can drop some few large wood pieces on the fire. You should double check the oven’s fullness by adding three to four big wood pieces at a time. As the fire grows big, bit by bit shut the bottom and open the air vents on the wood burning stove’s top. The objective is to cut back on the air generated but at the same time keep a descent amount of flames.

 

Optimum Performance

 

For a wood fueled fire to burn properly, it is essential to have enough air supply. That said, it’s vital to not overheat the stove, since high temperatures can cause damage to the metal. You can monitor the amount of the fire through adjustment of generated air using vents or the grate.

 

To check whether or not your stove is burning at optimum efficiency take a quick glance at the flames through the glass door. These flames should be visible enough and lively. Signals that indicate the fire is inefficient are if the flames are slow or intermittent, the fire is smoky, or there’s tar on the window. If the window shows signs of tar then there may even be tar residuals in the chimney, that is definitely a fire hazard to watch out for. As already explained and emphasized, it’s important to make sure that the wood has been seasoned before it’s inserted in a wood burning stove, since dampy woods may cause a build-up of resin or tar inside the chimney.

 

Last but not the least, use your log burner frequently to get the best from it. If a stove is used often for slow wood burning then it’s suggested to have a hot stove two times per week as this will help maintain the dryness of the chimney inside and avoid an accumulation of tar deposits.

Your are now a wood burning stove expert…….go get one!

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